Primal Blueprint Podcast (general)

A couple weeks ago, I linked to an article discussing the “obesity paradox”—the idea that across many different studies and populations, people with slightly overweight and even obese BMIs often have the lowest mortality risk. The author is Harriet Brown, a supporter of the “Health At Every Size” movement, comes down hard on the side of overweight/obesity as safe and even beneficial. At first glance, she makes a strong case. She appears to cite compelling research. She talks to obesity researchers who’ve found protective links between higher BMIs and better health and been lambasted by their colleagues. And if the general consensus is right, and carrying extra weight is so unhealthy, why are obesity and overweight consistently associated with a lower risk of death?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-2015-12-9.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Humans evolved within a seasonal context—without any of the modern accommodations that would buffer climate or weather influences. Why would our bodies not have adapted with responsive wiring?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-2015-12-3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

I thought I’d offer some of my favorite responses (some serious, some not) to the common questions we field at the holiday dinner table. To all of our MDA community, I’m grateful for your valued following and your incredible contributions over the years. I hope you’ll add your own favorite personal retorts, strategic redirects and discussion starters for the dinner table today!


(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)

 
 
Direct download: MDA-2015-11-26.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

It’s a legitimate and even, in some regards, culturally (and probably politically) significant question: why were government dietary guidelines ever put in place—and what was the backstory of their uses and modifications over time? Finally, what perspective can it bring to our understanding of embracing a “niche” dietary model like the Primal Blueprint?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)

Direct download: MDA-2015-10-22.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

It happens to the best of us. You start sneaking a few more bites of bread when out to dinner and trying your buddy’s delicious-looking pizza. Your workouts trickle to once a week, sometimes none. You walk less, couch more. And then one day, you realize you’ve gone off the wagon. You’ve gained belly fat. You’re getting winded going up the stairs. Your once-pleasurable hikes have become grueling affairs that you dread and end up avoiding. Your fridge is full of takeout boxes and you realize you haven’t cooked in two weeks. You need to restart your Primal lifestyle, and fast.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep302015-RestartYourPrimalLifestyle.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:58am PDT

Eating a Super-Clean, Plant-Heavy, Whole Foods Diet? You Might Have Fruit Belly!

A little discussed phenomenon is disturbingly common among health-conscious eaters, especially those diligent about eating plenty of fresh vegetables and fruits, low-fat dairy products, and whole grains. Granted, not very primal, but even super-primal-aligned folks suffer from digestive difficulties related to eating their abundant servings of veggies and fruit. The condition is called Fruit Belly—a bloated cranky, gurgly, and visceral-fat-hoarding abdomen that grows (or refuses to budge) despite your best efforts to eat healthy, and even despite your success at sculpting the rest of your body.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep292015-YouMightHaveFruitBelly.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:22am PDT

10 Things You Shouldn’t Do If You’re Trying to Build Muscle

While it’s important to think positive and focus on all the things you should be doing to achieve your goals, it’s equally important that we focus on those things that interfere with our goals and remind ourselves to avoid doing them. Some call it the “not to do list,” which I like. Many of the behaviors on not-to-do lists are deal breakers, so it’s arguably more crucial that we identify and curtail those that apply to our lives. But that’s hard; these are behaviors we might already be doing. Heck, they might be bad habits we’ve developed, or biases we’ve internalized. And so before adopting good behaviors, we should clear out the bad ones. Otherwise, we’re just pissing in the wind.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep232015-10ThingsYouShouldntDo.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:26am PDT

Why These 10 Famous Thinkers Napped

A few months ago, I wrote a guide to napping that included how, why, and when to flop down for a spell. That wasn’t a random throwaway post. It was the first salvo in a new war. I’m on a mission to legitimize the nap, to destigmatize the siesta for the average working human. And it’s not a selfish thing, because I can already pretty much take a nap whenever I want. I’m concerned about you. In a chronically sleep-deprived population such as ours, a 45 minute foray into the land of dreams can rejuvenate the mind, make up for sleep debt, and make us healthier and happier. Yet those who nap —or simply want to nap — often feel guilty about it, even if they have an hour or two to spare and are falling asleep at their desks. Perhaps it’ll make you feel better to know that some of the world’s greatest thinkers considered naps to be an integral part of their day — and their success.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep172015-10FamousThinkersNapped.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:06am PDT

The Primal Laws: 7 More Honorable Mentions

A couple months back, I gave you a list of Primal Laws that didn’t quite make the cut, either because they weren’t “big” enough or didn’t apply to enough people. Turns out I was probably wrong: the response was huge and many of you were on the same wavelength. You even offered up some of your own ideas for honorable mentions. So today, I’m giving you 7 more honorable mentions that almost deserved a spot on the final list of Primal Laws. Read the post, take what resonates with you and discard what doesn’t. But give the article a fair shake and really consider how adopting these laws could improve your life.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep162015-7MoreHonorableMentions.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:55am PDT

What You Need to Know About Foodborne Illness: Part 1

It’s a regular headline: “# of People Sickened by Contaminated Food.” Most recently, it was a case of imported cucumbers with salmonella (one of the most common and serious foodborne pathogens) that resulted in at least 341 people ill and two dead across 30 states. It’s difficult when public service information shifts us toward viewing our food with a nervous eye. The CDC estimates approximately 48 million people get sick from foodborne illness each year. Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized and about 3000 die. So, what do we do with this information?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Brock Armstrong)

Direct download: MDA-Sep152015-FoodborneIllnessP1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:08am PDT