Primal Blueprint Podcast

Categories

general

Archives

2017
June
May
April
March
February
January

2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April

2014
December

July 2016
S M T W T F S
     
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

Syndication

Every day we’re barraged by “good ideas”—all the things we should be doing with our lives and could start doing today if we really cared enough. Too much advice can overwhelm us, and, more importantly, it can inflate the power of “should.” It can cement an insidious (and, in my experience, ineffective) framework in our minds. We risk framing every choice—from work to pleasure—as an obligation. Doing so burdens life with a constant sense of onus, constraint and deprivation—not exactly the stuff of grand motivation. In my experience, we aren’t in for much fun or long-term success with that brand of approach. Luckily, there’s a better way to talk to ourselves.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-Jul282016-HowLanguageAffectsYourFitnessAndWeightLossPractice.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Coffee is serious business. We Americans drink about 400 million cups of it per day and spend several billion dollars on it each year. It’s the most popular drug on earth, and certainly the most socially acceptable. In many ways, coffee’s the closest thing we’ve got to a universal, daily ritual, as just about every morning, billions of people across the planet prostrate themselves before the holy, energy-giving legume. It also hails from the same place the earliest members of our species do: East Africa (Ethiopia, to be exact). That the most industrious animal ever to walk the planet and the psychoactive legume that fuels said industry both hail from the same place on earth is pure poetry.

Coffee’s also delicious. I’d say you’d have to pry my coffee from my cold, dead fingers, only the ensuing struggle would slosh it all onto the floor, and that would be such a waste.

Yet it’s also considered to be a vice, one of those substances that “everyone knows” is bad for you.


Is it?
 
(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-Jul272016-TheDefinitiveGuideToCoffee.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Every day we’re barraged by “good ideas”—all the things we should be doing with our lives and could start doing today if we really cared enough. Too much advice can overwhelm us, and, more importantly, it can inflate the power of “should.” It can cement an insidious (and, in my experience, ineffective) framework in our minds. We risk framing every choice—from work to pleasure—as an obligation. Doing so burdens life with a constant sense of onus, constraint and deprivation—not exactly the stuff of grand motivation. In my experience, we aren’t in for much fun or long-term success with that brand of approach. Luckily, there’s a better way to talk to ourselves.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-Jul262016-TakeItEasyIncreaseProgress.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Host Elle Russ chats with Cassie Parks, a Lifestyle Design Strategist who loves the ocean, dancing for no reason, and celebrating with champagne. What she loves most of all is living a life a she loves. Cassie is a best-selling author, international speaker and coach whose passion is leading others to live the life they have been dreaming about. Her latest book, Manifest $10,000 is available on amazon.com.

Cassie is the creator of the Manifest $10k course which has helped thousands of people manifest more money into their lives. You can join the course at manifest10k.com and learn more about working with Cassie at liveyourchampagnelife.com.

Direct download: Ep128_PrimalBlueprint_CassieParks.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

There’s a Flaubert quote I stumbled on once: “Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work.” I’ve always been more of a science man than an artist of course (and I don’t know that carbohydrate curves or sprint intervals could ever be creatively “violent” anyway). Nonetheless, something about the underlying concept always stayed with me. It begs a fundamental, even pivotal question: where do you want the freedom to be bold and impulsive (or at least spontaneous) in your life, and where do you want the security of being fixed and (relatively speaking) unyielding?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-Jul212016-BoringMayBeBetter.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

The difficult thing about headaches is figuring out why they’re occurring. Pain in other areas is different. You can look at your hand if it’s hurting and figure out why. You can see the cut on your knee and know what’s going on. But you are your head, and the headache is inside. Your consciousness sits behind your eyes observing reality and directing your role in it. It’s all a big mystery. Or so it feels.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)
Direct download: MDA-Jul202016-3CommonTypesOfHeadache.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Matt is a social entrepreneur in the fields of personalized health and future medicine. A heart- centered visionary, Matt is focused on changing the health trajectory of the human race. He orchestrates a global collaborative vision to revolutionize the concept of health as we know it and facilitate personalized, predictive and preventive health change around the world.

Matt holds a masters in applied human sciences, is a lecturer and clinical educator at several universities in Australia, and has been recognized for his passion and excellence in educating doctors, health professionals and fitness experts globally over the past 10 years.

In 2013, Matt founded the Ultimate Human Foundation, a non-profit with a mission to transform world health and assist in eliminating chronic pain and disease from the planet. Matt has founded 7 businesses in health and medicine over the past 10 years, launching ph360.me, the world’s first smart health app based on personalized epigenetics and gene expression and most recently launching Shae, the world’s first virtual assistant to deliver interactive, intuitive, and personalized insights for health.

Direct download: Ep127_PrimalBlueprint_MattRiemann1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am PDT

Although mainstream sources still mistake “the brain needs glucose” for “the brain can only run on glucose,” regular MDA readers know the truth: given sufficient adaptation, the brain can derive up to 75% of its fuel from ketone bodies, which the liver constructs using fatty acids. If we could only use glucose, we wouldn’t make it longer than a few days without food. If our brains couldn’t utilize fat-derived ketones, we’d drop dead as soon as our liver had exhausted its capacity to churn out glucose. We’d waste away, our lean tissue dissolving into amino acids for hepatic conversion into glucose to feed our rapacious brains. You’d end up a skeletal wraith with little else but your brain and a hypertrophied liver remaining until, eventually, the latter cannibalized itself in a last ditch search for glucose precursors for the tyrant upstairs. It would get ugly.

That’s adaptation. But is there an actual cognitive advantage to running on ketones?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)

Direct download: MDA-Jul192016-TheFatBurningBrain.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

How can you leverage doubt in pursuing a healthy life? Let me throw out a few takeaways and examples.

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)

Direct download: MDA-Jul142016-DontBeSoSure.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT

Bloating is mostly subjective. You can “feel” bloated without experiencing actual stomach bulging. Other times, it adds actual inches to your waistline.

Why does it happen? Why do our stomachs distend and our sphincters proclaim their gaseous intentions to the world? What causes this nebulous condition and how can we avoid and fix it?

(This Mark's Daily Apple article was written by Mark Sisson, and is narrated by Tina Leaman)

Direct download: MDA-Jul132016-12CommonCausesOfBloating.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm PDT